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(October 31, 2014) The Source Protection Plans for the Trent Conservation Coalition Source Protection Region have been approved by the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change. These plans, effective on January 1, 2015, set out policies that will protect the water sources that supply 53 municipal drinking water systems within a planning region stretching from Algonquin Park to Lake Ontario and the Bay of Quinte. The plans are a requirement of Ontario’s Clean Water Act, which was passed as a response to the Province’s inquiry into the Walkerton drinking water tragedy. In the Kawartha-Haliburton Source Protection Area there are 22…
We're now taking orders for our 2015 seedling distribution! There are 11 tree species, 8 shrub species, and 3 grass species available, all suitable to growing conditions in the Kawarthas. Whether you are creating a natural oasis on your property, building property value, or using plants to create windbreaks, you will find a range of species for your project. The shrubs and grasses are especially suited to shorelines. They will thrive in wet conditions, and grow deep, strong roots to help protect your shoreline from erosion. Click here for details about each species, including their preferred sites, characteristics, and the…
This month marks the 60th anniversary of one of Canada's deadliest natural disasters--Hurricane Hazel. It was the most severe flooding ever recorded in Ontario, occurring in October 1954 when Hazel passed into southern Ontario. Eighty-one people died, and damages, which included the loss of homes, bridges, and dams, were estimated at over $180 million. This led to changes that would help protect against flooding, changes that are still in effect today.   Flooding during Hurricane Hazel, Toronto, 1954. Photo courtesy of Environment Canada. Following the devastating impact of Hazel, a flood forecasting and warning system was established. Local Conservation Authorities,…
Wednesday, 10 September 2014 13:02

Blue Canoe Program makes a splash this summer

  Blue Canoe representatives Erinn Lawrie and Colin Carter paddled their way across seven lakes this summer, speaking with shoreline property owners about protecting water quality and ecological health. They reached more than 1,025 people, going from dock to dock and door to door, and sharing information at various events and meetings. The Blue Canoe Program is supported by the City of Kawartha Lakes and the RBC Blue Water Project, and has reached over 3,375 people in the Kawarthas since 2012! During their outreach, Erinn and Colin provided information packages, answered questions and concerns about the lakes, and conducted a…
With the picturesque marsh boardwalk as a backdrop, the new Kawartha Conservation Foundation was launched June 11 by its new president and members of its volunteer board of directors. Chief Administrative Officer Rob Messervey paid tribute to the “Friends” who, over a period of 18 years, helped support the vision and mandate of Kawartha Conservation by raising funds, promoting awareness, and engaging the community to restore and sustain a healthy environment for future generations. “They raised tens of thousands of dollars for environmental projects, such as this marsh boardwalk, securing grants for shoreline naturalization and education programs and, of course,…
Monday, 25 August 2014 20:00

Collecting rainwater for a sunny day

Capturing and storing rainwater for a dry, sunny day has many benefits, and it’s easy and inexpensive to do. Installing a rain barrel is one of the most common methods, and will provide you with a ready supply of water for your garden and lawn, and save on your utility bill. One of the less known benefits of rain barrels is that they can help reduce contaminants from entering local waterways. A large rush of rainwater during heavy rainfall that washes across lawns and driveways can pick up nutrients, such as pet waste or fertilizer, sediments, and other contaminants. These…
A rain garden is a landscaped depression that is planted with native shrubs, grasses, and flowers. It is designed to collect rain water that runs off of hardened surfaces such as your roof or driveway. When stormwater washes across hard surfaces it can pick up pollutants such as fertilizers, pesticides, bacteria from pet waste, and sediments. A rain garden slows and reduces stormwater runoff by temporarily holding it and allowing the water to soak into the ground. The plants also help filter the contaminants and sediments that would otherwise be carried into your lake or the nearest water body through…
Monday, 25 August 2014 20:00

A stable shoreline for a healthy lake

Nobody wants to come up to the lake and deal with shoreline problems. But many property owners in the Kawarthas are grappling with some common issues. These include erosion and ice damage, Canada geese, excessive aquatic plants, and blue-green algae in the water. Widespread, these problems threaten the health of the lake system as a whole. Many of these issues are made worse by traditional landscaping practices, such as manicured lawns right to the water and breakwalls. Without abundant vegetation, the shoreline is left unprotected and exposed to the forces of nature. That’s why more and more property owners in…
Dana Mumford, a retired GE employee, is a frequent visitor to Howlers Corners in Ken Reid Conservation Area near Lindsay with his two dogs. He and his wife Jane find the off leash dog park, the first of its kind in the area, a suitable spot for their 9 year old chocolate lab, Leslie, and 8 month old Shih Tzu-Lhasa, Teddy. “It is absolutely fantastic. The dogs love it. Everything they need is here. They run around and seem to enjoy it very much,” says Mr. Mumford. “They also learn to socialize with other dogs and it is just great!”…
With the opening of an additional 4.3 kilometres of trails this week, there’s much more to explore in Durham East Cross Forest Conservation Area. Kawartha Conservation held an official opening for the new trail system on June 26 with Durham MPP Granville Anderson, Scugog Mayor Chuck Mercier, and Brock Mayor Terry Clayton, along with partner organization representatives from the Oak Ridges Moraine Land Trust, Ontario Heritage Trust, Durham Field Naturalists, Oak Ridges Trail Association, and others. The new trails are in the south end of the conservation area, accessible from a new parking lot at 4531 Boundary Rd. They include…
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