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Items filtered by date: December 2016

JANUARY 30, 2017 – Kawartha Conservation has extended the commenting period for the second draft of the Four Mile Lake Plan until mid-July. The commenting extension is meant to ensure seasonal residents who don’t have access to the revised documents Online can review and comment when they return to the area. An open house will also be held in early June to answer questions about the revised plan.
 
“We appreciate all of the comments we have received to date regarding the second draft of the Four Mile Lake Plan and would like to thank everyone who took the time to review the community-driven changes reflected in the second draft,” said Dave Pridham, Manager, Conservation Lands, Education and Stewardship Services. “We have been made aware that not all residents or seasonal residents have access to review the documents Online, and it is important we receive everyone’s input. We are also happy to meet individually with anyone who wishes to discuss any aspect of the plan or the lake or watershed study.”

The first draft of the plan was released for public comment in August of 2016 and included open houses in Coboconk and Burnt River.

Draft two of the Plan has taken into consideration all of the feedback Kawartha Conservation received throughout the initial public consultation process.

“The purpose of Plan is to summarize the ecological state of the watershed and to provide advice for lake stakeholders on how to maintain excellent water quality, recreational enjoyment, fish and wildlife populations, and monitoring on Four Mile Lake,” said Aquatic Biologist Brett Tregunno.

Posted on the website at www.KawarthaConservation.com along with the second draft will be an accompanying publication to the Plan entitled the Four Mile Lake Watershed Characterization Report; this provides more detailed technical information on several aspects of the Lake.

Comments on both publications can be emailed directly to Brett Tregunno at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or mailed to 277 Kenrei Road, Lindsay, ON K9V 4R1.

Published in Media Releases

JANUARY 25, 2017 – Brock Township Regional Councillor Ted Smith was elected Chair of the Kawartha Conservation Board of Directors during the first meeting of 2017 on Wednesday. Coun. Smith served as vice-chair of the Board previously.

“I have been a member of the Kawartha Conservation Board of Directors for six years and have always admired and appreciated the good work that is done throughout our watershed,” said Coun. Smith. “There are a lot of challenges ahead of us and a lot of important work that will be happening, which I look forward to championing as we move forward.”

Municipality of Trent Lakes’ Peter Raymond was nominated and subsequently acclaimed as vice-chair of the Kawartha Conservation Board of Directors.

Returning to the Board for 2017 is Ron Hooper (Municipality of Clarington), Don Kett (Township of Scugog), Pat Dunn (City of Kawartha Lakes, Gord Miller (City of Kawartha Lakes), Peter Raymond (Municipality of Trent Lakes), Tom Rowett (Township of Scugog) and Jordan Landry (Township of Cavan Monaghan). Newly appointed member Isaac Breadner replaces outgoing member, and past-chair Heather Stauble, as the City of Kawartha Lakes third representative on the Board of Directors.

Kawartha Conservation’s mission is to be leaders in integrated watershed management and conservation with a focus on outstanding water quality and quantity management, supported by healthy landscapes through planning, stewardship, science and education.

Published in Media Releases

January 23, 2017 – A new interactive drought map for the Kawartha Conservation watershed will allow residents and businesses to report areas that are experiencing well issues across the region.

The new tool is part of the Kawartha Water Response Team’s ongoing efforts to educate and inform watershed residents and businesses about low water conditions.

Available under ‘Highlights’ on the Kawartha Conservation website homepage (www.kawarthaconservation.com), the public is able to select a general area where their well is located, as well as provide comments, however no personal information is required.

“The interactive mapping tool allows residents and businesses to pinpoint where their wells are located and provide details on the well and problems they are experiencing,” explained Kawartha Conservation hydrologist Iryna Shulyarenko. “The information input both locally, and across the broader region, will provide Conservation Authority staff with greater detail as to what is happening with ground water levels within various locations in our watershed.

The interactive map is already available and has been used by residents and businesses in the Mississippi Valley Conservation Authority and Cataraqui Region Conservation Authority watersheds in eastern Ontario.

“This is a great continuation of the interactive mapping which helps provide valuable information about where well issues are occurring across multiple Conservation Authority regions,” said Ms. Iryna Shulyarenko.

Residents and businesses on wells are able to visit the Kawartha Conservation website and select ‘Drought Map’ on the left hand side of the homepage. Once on the mapping tool, users can scroll to different geographic areas and zoom in and out close to their specific location.

Once the user has zoomed to the appropriate area, they can select the ‘User Input’ point from the Smart Editor, click in the desired map area, and add comments before saving.

For more information about the interactive drought map, please contact Kawartha Conservation hydrologist Iryna Shulyarenko at 705-328-2271 Ext. 219 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Published in Media Releases

January 13, 2017 – The freeze thaw cycle that has characterized much of early winter across the Kawartha Conservation watershed, bringing both rain and snow to the region, has helped to improve lake levels and water flows.

On Thursday, January 12, the Kawartha Water Response Team reduced the Level II low water condition declaration for the majority of the watershed to a Level I low water condition.

In the Township of Scugog, where drought conditions during much of 2016 resulted in the most severe Level III low water declaration, mixed precipitation during December and the early parts of January have improved water levels and water flows significantly, resulting in the move to a Level I low water condition.  

“Recorded three month precipitation from October to December ranged from 66 percent in the north to 86 percent at Ken Reid Conservation Area,” explained Kawartha Conservation Hydrologist Iryna Shulyarenko. “However, actual December precipitation ranged from 110 percent of average December values in the north to 149 percent of December averages at Ken Reid Conservation Area.

“Our flow indicators for December also show that all of the watershed’s monitoring locations reported flows that are significantly higher than the long-term minimum monthly summer flow,” added Ms. Shulyarenko.

In December, the Pigeon River monitoring station showed flows at 113 percent of the Minimum monthly summer flow, while the Blackstock Creek monitoring station reported flows at 335 percent and Nonquon River, near Port Perry showed flows at 550 percent of the minimum monthly summer flow.

While the increased precipitation is good news for residents and businesses across the Kawartha Conservation watershed, ground water supplies are not likely to be significantly impacted until spring when air temperature returns to the stable above freezing mark.

“Those individuals with very, very shallow wells may notice some improvement, but we are not anticipating much improvement in the ground water supply until spring as the infiltration from melting snow becomes steady,” said Ms. Shulyarenko. “We are continuing to ask residents and businesses to voluntarily reduce their water consumption. Water is a shared resource and every little bit of water conservation will help make a difference for you and your neighbour.”

In response to the impact of the low water conditions on ground water supplies during 2016, Kawartha Conservation, in conjunction with the City of Kawartha Lakes, Farm & Food Care and the Ontario Ministry Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs are hosting a one-day Agricultural drought resilience workshop in Fenelon Falls on Tuesday, January 31.

“We’ve heard from members of our agricultural community about the challenges they have experienced over the last year,” said Ms. Shipclark. “This aim of this workshop is to provide valuable information from a variety of sources to area farmers and landowners. We have put together an agenda that will help address a lot of the questions and provide important and useful information for our agricultural community.”

The cost for the event is $20 and includes lunch. Interested persons must register Online in advance at www.KawarthaConservation.com/agwater or by contacting Kelly Maloney at the City of Kawartha Lakes, 705-324-9411 Ext. 1208.

Published in Low Water Messages

JANUARY 11, 2017 - Kawartha Conservation has announced the start of its bulk tree seedling sale for spring 2017.

Landowners in the area – rural, agricultural, and shoreline – are invited to choose from a variety of species, along with a new selection of native shrubs that are suitable for shorelines.

The trees and shrubs are 1 to 3 years old and bare root. The prices for tree seedlings range from $0.60 to $1.95 per seedling and are available in units of 25 seedlings.

Holly Shipclark, Kawartha Conservation Stewardship Coordinator, said that there is information included as part of the order form that will help landowners to make informed decisions about which trees to plant for their property type.  There is also more detailed information about choosing the right tree available on the Kawartha Conservation Seedling Program page.

“Often, landowners ask about what to plant, where the best planting locations are, and how to plant. By helping them to locate detailed information on plant species and their characteristics, preferred planting sites, and the benefits of each species, we hope to make it easy to decide,” said Ms. Shipclark.    

There are a number of benefits to planting trees and shrubs - saving on heating and cooling costs when planted near your home, blocking highway traffic noise, greater privacy, and a higher property value. Environmental benefits include reduced soil erosion, healthier shorelines, more oxygen, less carbon dioxide, additional wildlife habitat, cleaner water, and a healthier watershed.

Over the past 36 years, Kawartha Conservation has helped distribute over 600,000 seedlings across the watershed.

Landowners can find detailed guidelines for selecting the best plants for their properties at www.KawarthaConservation.com/seedling-distribution.

For orders exceeding $250, a payment of 50% is required at least two weeks prior to the pickup date, tentatively scheduled for April 29 & 30, 2017 in Ken Reid Conservation Area (277 Kenrei Rd., Lindsay) and Willowtree Farm at 975 Regional Road 21, Port Perry.

To place an order or to talk about which species are best for your property, please contact Holly Shipclark at 705.328.2271 ext. 223 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The deadline to place an order is March 31, 2017.

Published in Media Releases

January 9, 2017 – Ken Reid Conservation Area is the perfect place for students to learn this winter. Through Kawartha Conservation’s comprehensive education program, teachers can introduce their students to a variety of outdoor education classes sure to have them engaged and eager to learn.

With a series of classes aimed at Kindergarten to Grade 3, students can participate in Nature Photography, Snowshoeing and Tracks, Orienteering or the Changing Seasons Games and Scavenger Hunt.

“We have designed our education programs with the Ontario school curriculum in mind,” explained Kawartha Conservation Environmental Programs/GIS Specialist Nancy Aspden. “Our programs offer a fun, engaging experience for students and teachers, outside of a traditional classroom setting.”

Depending on the classes chosen, students will experience the wonders of winter as they are guided on a hike through Ken Reid Conservation Area, take part in snowshoeing games, look for signs of animal life by observing animal tracks, create a beautiful nature photo, learn more about the changing seasons and witness first-hand the impact of seasonal change on living and non-living elements in nature, and much, much more.

“We want to make learning fun and create an experience that allows the students to take home important knowledge while encouraging them to enjoy their natural surroundings,” said Ms. Aspden. “The feedback we have received from teachers and students has been great, and we’re looking forward to welcoming new classes to Ken Reid Conservation Area this winter.”

For primary grade students taking part in outdoor learning programs at Ken Reid Conservation Area, 60 pairs of Trillium Lakelands District School Board (TLDSB) snowshoes are available and help provide a mixture of fun, exercise and learning in a beautiful outdoor venue.

For more information or to book an outdoor class at Ken Reid Conservation Area teachers are encouraged to visit kawarthaconservation.com/education, contact Nancy Aspden by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by calling 705-328-2271 Ext. 218.

Published in Media Releases

JANUARY 6, 2017 – With plenty of fresh snow on the ground now is a great time to enjoy skiing, snowshoeing, bird watching, hiking and more at Durham East Cross Forest Conservation Area.
The 1,334 acre property boasts more than 7 kilometres of sustained trails for hiking, bird watching, horseback riding, cross-country skiing.
As part of a multi-use trail system, Durham East Cross Forest Conservation Area does have an active snowmobile trail that runs through the centre of the property, as part of an access agreement with the Ontario Federation of Snowmobile Clubs (OFSC).
“Winter is a fantastic time to explore Durham East Cross Forest Conservation Area,” said Jonathan Hale, Conservation Areas Acting Coordinator. “We have kilometres of sustained multi-use trails that offer spectacular scenery. Whether you enjoy snowshoeing, cross-country skiing or just hiking through the woods, Durham East Cross Forest offers something for everyone.”
Winding along the trails visitors will pass through sugar maple forests, pine plantations, open meadows and sand barrens.
Cross-country skiing and snowshoeing, in particular, are exhilarating ways to see the countryside and have an amazing workout at the same time. Durham East Cross Forest Conservation Area is ideal for these activities with its level topography and network of exciting trails to explore.
Whether you’re planning to ski or snowshoe, here are some simple tips to make your outing more enjoyable.

Tips
• Wear several thinner layers rather than one heavy layer – you may start out cold, but you’ll soon heat up with this activity.
• Take a bottle of water and a snack.
• Be prepared for a change in the weather.

Published in Media Releases

JANUARY 6, 2017 – With plenty of fresh snow on the ground now is a great time to enjoy skiing, snowshoeing, bird watching, hiking and more at Ken Reid Conservation Area.
The 272 acre property boasts 15 trails including the 2.4 km Woodland Loop, 1.2 km Escarpment Trail, 2.7 km Point Trail, and several smaller trails of 200 to 400 meters in length.
“Winter is a really great time to explore Ken Reid Conservation Area,” said Jonathan Hale, Conservation Areas Acting Coordinator. “We have kilometres of trails of different lengths and spectacular scenery. Whether you enjoy snowshoeing, cross-country skiing or just hiking through the woods, Ken Reid offers something for everyone.”
Cross-country skiing and snowshoeing are exhilarating ways to see the countryside and have an amazing workout at the same time. Ken Reid Conservation Area is ideal for these activities with its level topography and network of exciting trails to explore.
Whether you’re planning to ski or snowshoe, here are some simple tips to make your outing more enjoyable.

Tips
• Wear several thinner layers rather than one heavy layer – you may start out cold, but you’ll soon heat up with this activity.
• Take a bottle of water and a snack.
• Be prepared for a change in the weather.

Published in Media Releases