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AUGUST 13, 2019 – Council members and staff with the City of Kawartha Lakes received an update and presentation on the newly-completed Burnt River Flood Plain Mapping Tuesday afternoon.

Director of Planning, Development and Engineering, Ron Warne and GIS/Mapping Technician Galen Yerex made the presentation to Council.

The mapping was completed over 18-months and pulls 130 years of weather and hydrological data to provide the City and its residents with the most technically accurate flood plain information for the Burnt River area.

“Technology has improved dramatically since the flood plain mapping was last completed in 1991,” explained Mr. Yerex. “The updated flood plain mapping will provide better emergency management and planning information to the City and residents.”

With the dramatic flooding that property owners once again experienced this spring, the updated mapping will enhance the protection of people and property by clearly identifying flood-prone areas.

Staff surveyed high water marks during the Burnt River flood events that occurred in 2013 and 2016. These high-water marks were used to help calibrate the updated 2019 Burnt River hydraulic model. The model calibration was completed using a flood frequency analysis and the historic high flows measured by the Burnt River flow gauge station.

“The updated Burnt River flood study used several decades of historic flow gauge data, real flood event high-water marks as well as more accurate data compared to the 1991 Burnt River Flood study,” explained Mr. Yerex.

The resulting updated flood line yielded results that were largely similar to the 1991 Burnt River Flood Plain Mapping study in terms of the extent of the floodplain; however, the updated study references better information and almost 30 years of additional water flows, thereby providing greater reassurance of the quality of the updated flood line. This, in turn, helps instill greater confidence in the flood models and for planning purposes.

The 2019 Burnt River flood was higher, longer and contained more water than any other flood in the City’s history. The water levels in 2019 were 20 centimetres higher than the historic flood of 2013.

“What is perhaps even more alarming is that the water levels in a regulatory flood event – in this situation, based on the Timmins Flood from August 31, 1961 – would have resulted in twice as much water flowing through the Burnt River as what was experienced this spring,” explained Mr. Yerex.
Kawartha Lakes Mayor, and Vice-Chair of the Kawartha Conservation Board of Directors, Andy Letham noted the project is a critical update to the existing 1991 flood plain mapping.

“This updated mapping will be instrumental and invaluable in supporting our planning staff and the residents of Kawartha Lakes in understanding where issues currently exist and potentially could exist,” said Mayor Letham. “We appreciate the expertise and hard work of Kawartha Conservation in being able to provide this critical mapping to us.

“We share the same goal of helping to protect the people and property of residents in Kawartha Lakes and working together to identify flood prone areas through updated flood plain mapping is an important step in achieving that goal,” added Mr. Letham.

To learn more about the Burnt River Flood Plain mapping studies, or additional studies that have been completed visit Kawartha Conservation online at http://kawarthaconservation.com/permits-planning/flood-plain-mapping-studies.

Published in Blog

MAY 23, 2019 – Kawartha Conservation’s Board of Directors has endorsed the updated flood plain mapping for the Burnt River. The 18-month project was completed by the conservation authority for the City of Kawartha Lakes.

“Technology has improved dramatically since the flood plain mapping was last completed in 1991,” explained Kawartha Conservation GIS/Mapping Technician Galen Yerex. “The updated flood plain mapping will provide better emergency management and planning information to the City and residents.”

With the dramatic flooding that property owners once again experienced this spring, the updated mapping will enhance the protection of people and property by clearly identifying flood-prone areas.

“This project will serve as an important update to the existing flood plain mapping for the area,” said Kawartha Conservation CAO Mark Majchrowski. “Ultimately with newer technology and processes we will be able to refine the Burnt River flood plain mapping with new detailed topographical information. This updated mapping will help protect people and their investments.”

Staff surveyed high water marks during the Burnt River flood events that occurred in 2013 and 2016. These high water marks were used to help calibrate the updated 2019 Burnt River hydraulic model. The model calibration was completed using a flood frequency analysis and the historic high flows measured by the Burnt River flow gauge station.

The flood frequency outputs/flood elevations for the 25 and 50 year flood events meshed well with the high water mark elevation data collected in 2013 and 2016.

The updated Burnt River flood study used several decades of historic flow gauge data, real flood event high-water marks as well as more accurate data compared to the 1991 Burnt River Flood study.

The resulting updated floodline yielded results that were largely similar to the 1991 Burnt River Flood Plain Mapping study in terms of the extent of the floodplain; however, the updated study references better information and almost 30 years of additional water flows, thereby providing greater reassurance of the quality of the updated floodline. This, in turn, helps instill greater confidence in the flood models and for planning purposes.

“Given the historic flooding issues along the Burnt River watershed, this new detailed flood plain mapping will aid in ensuring safe planning and development work and help provide invaluable information moving forward,” said Chris Marshall, Director of Development Services for the City of Kawartha Lakes.

Published in Media Releases

May 15, 2019 – Kawartha Conservation staff have launched two floodplain mapping projects to continue the critical work of updating or establishing floodplain mapping tools within the Kawartha watershed. McLaren’s Creek and Fenelon Falls South will be the subject sites for the next 18-months.

Updating and establishing floodplain mapping for approximately 9.5 kilometres of McLaren’s Creek and 6.5 kilometres of Fenelon Falls South will help guide land use decisions in the two areas for the foreseeable future.

City of Kawartha Lakes and Conservation Authority staff were informed they had been approved for a National Disaster Mitigation Program funding grant towards the $180,000 cost of both projects.

“As the frequency and intensity of severe weather events continue to grow, updating and establishing floodplain mapping is critical to the safety of people and property,” explained Kawartha Conservation CAO Mark Majchrowski. “These two projects continue to better position Kawartha Conservation and the City of Kawartha Lakes to provide added surety in protecting people and their property from flooding events, and will be used in our planning and permitting activity.”

Richard Holy, Manager of Policy Planning for the City of Kawartha Lakes said once complete, the floodplain mapping will help guide land use decisions in the area.

“The City is very pleased to have Kawartha Conservation receive the National Disaster Mitigation Program funding from the Federal government, which will be used to secure and establish floodplain mapping for McLaren’s Creek and Fenelon Falls South,” he said. “The floodplain mapping for these two areas will improve our understanding of the watercourses and better guide land use decisions in the future.”

With improved technology, the data provided through these floodplain mapping projects will allow the City and Kawartha Conservation to be much more prepared for potential threats.

Kawartha Conservation and City staff both noted the updated floodplain mapping will provide better emergency management and planning information.

Published in Media Releases
Friday, 10 May 2019 15:17

FLOOD WATCH – KAWARTHA LAKES

A FLOOD WATCH is now in effect for the shoreline areas of Balsam, Cameron, Sturgeon and Pigeon lakes.
A FLOOD WARNING for the shoreline areas of Kawartha Lakes within the Kawartha Conservation watershed jurisdiction has been lifted. 

DATE:    May 10, 2019
TIME:    3:00 pm
               
Message sent on the basis of information received from:

  • Kawartha Conservation Flood Forecasting Network
  • Trent-Severn Waterway
  • Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry – Surface Water Monitoring Centre
  • Environment Canada

Affected Municipalities:

  • City of Kawartha Lakes
  • Municipality of Trent Lakes

A FLOOD WATCH is now in effect for the shoreline areas of Balsam, Cameron, Sturgeon and Pigeon lakes.

A FLOOD WARNING for the shoreline areas of Kawartha Lakes within the Kawartha Conservation watershed jurisdiction has been lifted.  

The lake water levels have continued declining.  Minor fluctuations may be observed, but a steady downward trend is expected for the weekend.

However, all lakes are still above full level conditions and should be considered extremely dangerous. Kawartha Conservation is warning all residents to stay away from the shoreline areas, as well as water structures such as locks and dams. Shorelines and banks are saturated, slippery, and may be and undercut. Children should be warned of dangerous conditions and caregivers should maintain a close watch on children who are outside.

TSW continues to reassess the situation on a daily basis and adjust flow through the water control structures as conditions require.

Shoreline residents are advised to continue monitoring their properties and contact their local municipality should any threat of flooding exists. Local municipalities are first to respond to and assist with flood emergencies.

Municipalities are advised to continue monitoring shoreline areas and be prepared to respond to high water emergencies if they occur.
Local rivers and streams throughout the Kawartha Conservation watershed jurisdiction are flowing at slightly elevated levels responding to the rain received over the last 24 hours. However, no low risk is observed at this time. As a result no flood message is currently in effect for the watershed’s jurisdiction

Additional information from the TSW is available at the Water Management InfoNet web page https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/lhn-nhs/on/trentsevern/info/infonet .  Residents can also call the TSW information line at 705-750-4064.

For assistance in the event of a flood, and to obtain sandbags, please contact your local municipality directly.

Kawartha Conservation will continue monitoring local watercourses and notify the public and municipalities within its watershed jurisdiction of any changes. We are in close communication with partner agencies such as the Trent Severn Waterway, Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, and neighbouring Conservation Authorities on this situation.

This flood message will be in effect until, Tuesday May 14th 2019.  If you are aware of or have concerns about flooding, please contact Kawartha Conservation at 705.328.2271 or 705.344.0155 after hours.

Iryna Shulyarenko                                                                         Emma Collyer     
Hydrologist                                                                                    Director, Integrated Watershed Management                                                   

A Flood Watch is a notice that flooding is possible in specific watercourses or municipalities. Municipalities, emergency services, and individual landowners in flood-prone areas should prepare. Responses to flood events are handled by Municipal emergency services.

Kawartha Conservation, May 9, 2019 – The flooding that has recently occurred in numerous communities throughout several provinces in Canada is a stark reminder of how devastating the damage can be. Our thoughts and hearts go out to everyone impacted by the floods.

The conservation authority wants to take this opportunity to remind residents that flooding can happen to anyone. It’s important to know that you can take steps now to protect yourself and hopefully minimize the risk of flooding and/or be prepared in case it does happen to you.

Find out what your insurance covers

Call your insurance company today and find out what kind of flood insurance coverage you have (or don’t!). There are two types of flooding for which you may or may not have insurance.

Overland flooding occurs when water comes into the home from “over land”, through windows and doors, as in the case when rivers and lakes spill over their banks. Insurance for overland flooding has only been available in Canada since 2015.

Sewer back up happens when water and sewer infrastructure becomes overloaded (as in the case of massive storms that occur abruptly) and backs up into homes, generally destroying basements. According to the Insurance Bureau of Canada, the average repair costs for a flooded basement are $43,000.

Talk with your local government

Call or visit your local municipality’s website to find out about any programs they offer to help with reducing the chance of basement flooding. Sometimes municipalities offer rebate programs to help with the costs associated with things such as installing backwater valves.

Talk with the conservation authority

Do you know if you live in or near a flood zone? Kawartha Conservation has maps that you can view online anytime. They show areas that lie within its regulations, which include flood zones. You can view the maps here at: http://kawarthaconservation.com/regulations-mapping. Remember, being in a regulated area doesn't necessarily mean you're in a flood zone. It could be regulated for a number of reasons and only qualified staff at Kawartha Conservation can understand our maps in enough detail to know the reason for the regulation.

If you find out you're in a regulated area, contact Kawartha Conservation to find out the reason for the regulation.
Kawartha Conservation has also completed a number of Flood Plain Mapping Studies for specific areas of the City of Kawartha Lakes. You can view the studies and maps here: http://kawarthaconservation.com/permits-planning/flood-plain-mapping-studies.

Take your own steps to protect your home from basement flooding

  • Never pour fats, oils and grease down your drains - if your drains aren’t clear, they could end up backing up into your house
  • Reduce water use in your home during heavy rains
  • Keep the storm sewer grates on your street clear of yard waste, leaves, ice and snow
  • Clean and maintain your eaves troughs and downspouts at least once a year
  • Store anything expensive (electronics) or irreplaceable (photo albums) upstairs
  • Ensure that your downspouts are directed onto non-paved surfaces
  • Make sure your sump pump is working properly and get a back-up system for use during a power failure
  • Install a backwater valve – you’ll need a professional for this

Climate change is real

Storms are only anticipated to get worse, not better. The weather of the past is not a predictor of the weather of the future, so taking some pre-emptive steps now, even if you don’t think you’re at risk, just might save you trouble down the road.

It never rains, it pours
Conservation authority urges residents to take measures to reduce flood risk

Kawartha Conservation, May 8, 2019 – The flooding that has recently occurred in numerous communities throughout several provinces in Canada is a stark reminder of how devastating the damage can be. Our thoughts and hearts go out to everyone impacted by the floods.

The conservation authority wants to take this opportunity to remind residents that flooding can happen to anyone. It’s important to know that you can take steps now to protect yourself and hopefully minimize the risk of flooding and/or be prepared in case it does happen to you.

Find out what your insurance covers

Call your insurance company today and find out what kind of flood insurance coverage you have (or don’t!). There are two types of flooding for which you may or may not have insurance.

Overland flooding occurs when water comes into the home from “over land”, through windows and doors, as in the case when rivers and lakes spill over their banks. Insurance for overland flooding has only been available in Canada since 2015.

Sewer back up happens when water and sewer infrastructure becomes overloaded (as in the case of massive storms that occur abruptly) and backs up into homes, generally destroying basements. According to the Insurance Bureau of Canada, the average repair costs for a flooded basement are $43,000.

Talk with your local government

Call or visit your local municipality’s website to find out about any programs they offer to help with reducing the chance of basement flooding. Sometimes municipalities offer rebate programs to help with the costs associated with things such as installing backwater valves.

Talk with the conservation authority

Do you know if you live in or near a flood zone? Kawartha Conservation has maps that you can view online anytime. They show areas that lie within its regulations, which include flood zones. You can view the maps here at:  http://kawarthaconservation.com/regulations-mapping. Remember, being in a regulated area doesn't necessarily mean you're in a flood zone. It could be regulated for a number of reasons and only qualified staff at Kawartha Conservation can understand our maps in enough detail to know the reason for the regulation.

If you find out you're in a regulated area, contact Kawartha Conservation to find out the reason for the regulation.

Kawartha Conservation has also completed a number of Flood Plain Mapping Studies for specific areas of the City of Kawartha Lakes. You can view the studies and maps here: http://kawarthaconservation.com/permits-planning/flood-plain-mapping-studies.

Take your own steps to protect your home from basement flooding

·        Never pour fats, oils and grease down your drains - if your drains aren’t clear, they could end up backing up into your house

·        Reduce water use in your home during heavy rains

·        Keep the storm sewer grates on your street clear of yard waste, leaves, ice and snow

·        Clean and maintain your eaves troughs and downspouts at least once a year

·        Store anything expensive (electronics) or irreplaceable (photo albums) upstairs

·        Ensure that your downspouts are directed onto non-paved surfaces

·        Make sure your sump pump is working properly and get a back-up system for use during a power failure

·        Install a backwater valve – you’ll need a professional for this

Climate change is real

Storms are only anticipated to get worse, not better. The weather of the past is not a predictor of the weather of the future, so taking some pre-emptive steps now, even if you don’t think you’re at risk, just might save you trouble down the road.

Published in Media Releases

APRIL 30, 2019 – At a time when more money and resources are needed to provide natural hazard and flooding programs to municipalities and the public, the Provincial government has cut conservation authority budgets for those program areas by 50 percent.

Mark Majchrowski, CAO for Kawartha Conservation, says that despite the recent cuts announced as part of the PCs first budget, the conservation authority will continue to provide the programs and services the member municipalities and public need and rely on.

“We’re seeing more severe and more frequent weather events impacting the communities we live in,” explained Mr. Majchrowski. “Our staff provide services and programs that include ongoing monitoring of water flows, levels and weather conditions which allows us to understand and predict how the events will impact our communities; that information is then shared with our municipal partners and the community. We understand how critical that information is and we will continue to provide those programs and services.”

Mr. Majchrowski said the reduction in funding will present challenges in the coming months as well as in subsequent budgets.

“There’s no question the reduction in funding is going to have an impact on our organization,” said Mr. Majchrowski. “We’re going to have to look at how we can address this type of reduction and continue to provide the very valuable programming that our customers, communities and partners have told us are important to them.”

Kawartha Conservation receives just over $47,000 from the province for flood programming. That is now reduced to about $23,500.

“Our priority is to make sure that we are providing the critical services and programs that our watershed residents, partners and municipalities need,” said Mr. Majchrowski. “Regardless of the financial challenges and uncertainties this reduction has resulted in for our organization, I want to assure all of our partners and the broader community that we will continue to make sure they have the information they need to protect themselves and their families.”

Published in Media Releases

DATE:    April 29, 2019
TIME:    2:00 pm               

Message sent on the basis of information received from:

  • Kawartha Conservation Flood Forecasting Network
  • Trent-Severn Waterway
  • Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry – Surface Water Monitoring Centre
  • Environment Canada

Affected Municipalities:

  • City of Kawartha Lakes

Municipality of Trent Lakes

A FLOOD WARNING remains in place for the shoreline areas of Balsam, Cameron, Sturgeon and Pigeon lakes. There is potential for flooding to occur along shorelines, in near shore areas, and in low-lying areas as a large volume of water passes through the Trent River system.

Water levels in the large Kawartha Lakes remain exceptionally high. As reported by the Trent-Severn Waterway officials, all lakes are equally overfilled.

  • Balsam and Cameron lakes have demonstrated a slight decrease in their water levels, by 4 cm, since Saturday, April 27th. Trent Severn Waterways has advised us that flow through the Rosedale and Fenelon Falls dams will be reduced today. As a result, lakes are expected to halt their declining trend and remain at the same level for the next 24 hours.
  • Water level in Sturgeon Lake has risen another 5 cm since yesterday morning. As inflow from the Cameron Lake is being reduced, it is anticipated that the rate of water level increase will slow down to 1-3 cm during the next 24 hours.
  • Pigeon Lake, as part of the Tri-Lakes system, has risen by 3 cm since yesterday morning and is expected to continue increasing at the rate of 1 to 3 cm over the next 24 hours.

Another round of precipitation, up to 35 mm, is forecasted on Wednesday for the region.  As a result, the very high inflow from the northern tributaries and very high water levels at the Kawartha Lakes will be sustained.

Lake Scugog has been declining very slowly since Saturday, April 27th. However, with the predicted rain it is expected to level off .

Trent Severn Waterway’s officials monitor this situation closely. They are reassessing the conditions on a daily basis and adjusting the flows through water control structures to relieve pressure in the affected areas.

Under these circumstances, all near shore areas should be considered dangerous. Currents in the vicinity of dams are swift and treacherous, banks wet, slippery and may be undercut. Kawartha Conservation is warning all residents to stay a safe distance from all water bodies, as well as water structures such as bridges, culverts, and dams. Children should be warned of dangerous conditions and caregivers should maintain a close watch on children who are outside.

Shoreline residents are advised to take precautions to protect themselves and their property, to monitor water levels closely, and contact their local municipality should any threat of flooding develop.

Municipalities are advised to monitor areas historically known for flooding and be prepared to respond to high water situations as they occur. Residents are advised to contact their municipalities should a flood threat develop. Local municipalities are first to respond to and assist with flood emergencies.

Additional information from the TSW is available at the Water Management InfoNet web page https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/lhn-nhs/on/trentsevern/info/infonet or at 705-750-4064.
Burnt and Gull River levels are monitored by staff from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF). Residents along these two rivers are requested to direct any questions concerning water levels to the MNRF Minden Area office at 705-286-5207 or  refer to the messages issued by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) at https://www.ontario.ca/law-and-safety/flood-forecasting-and-warning-program .

For assistance in the event of a flood, and to obtain sandbags, please contact your local municipality directly.

Kawartha Conservation will continue monitoring local watercourses and notify the public and municipalities within its watershed jurisdiction of any changes. We are in close communication with partner agencies such as the Trent Severn Waterway, Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, and neighbouring Conservation Authorities on this situation.

This Flood Warning will be in effect until Wednesday, May 1st 2019.  If you are aware of or have concerns about flooding, please contact Kawartha Conservation at 705.328.2271 or 705.344.0155 after hours.

Iryna Shulyarenko                                                                         Emma Collyer     
Hydrologist                                                                                   Director, Integrated Watershed Management                                 

A Flood Warning is a notice issued when flooding is imminent or occurring in specific watercourses or municipalities. It is the highest warning level.

WATERSHED CONDITIONS STATEMENT – WATER SAFETY – Kawartha Conservation watershed

DATE:    April 29, 2019
TIME:    2:00 pm               

Message sent on the basis of information received from:

  • Kawartha Conservation Flood Forecasting Network
  • Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry - Surface Water Monitoring Centre
  • Environment Canada
  • Trent-Severn Waterway

A WATERSHED CONDITIONS STATEMENT – WATER SAFETY remains in place for the Kawartha Conservation watershed.

Rivers and streams across the Kawartha Conservation watershed are currently flowing in moderately increased water levels in response to the series of the precipitation events over the last two weeks. Majority of the smaller watercourses have returned to their channels, while larger streams are still declining.   

Water levels in the large Kawartha Lakes continue to be exceptionally high as a large amount of water is moving through the Trent River system. For more information, please refer to the Flood Warning-Kawartha Lakes-Update, issued today April 29th 2019.

Lake Scugog has been declining very slowly since Saturday, April 27th.

Another round of precipitation, up to 35 mm, is forecasted for the region on Wednesday, May 1st. As a result, water levels and flows in watercourses across the Kawartha Conservation watershed jurisdiction are expected to rise once again. Lake Scugog is expected to halt its decline and level off.

No flooding problems within and around local rivers and streams are anticipated at this time.  However, all watercourses will continue to be dangerous. Kawartha Conservation is warning all residents to stay a safe distance from all water bodies, as well as water structures such as bridges, culverts, and dams. River banks are saturated, slippery and may be undercut. Children should be warned of dangerous conditions and caregivers should maintain a close watch on children who are outside.
Northern tributaries, such as the Burnt and Gull River are monitored by staff from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF). Residents along these two rivers are requested to direct any questions concerning water levels to the MNRF Minden Area office at 705-286-5207 or refer to the messages issued by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) at https://www.ontario.ca/law-and-safety/flood-forecasting-and-warning-program .

Additional information from the TSW is available at the Water Management InfoNet web page https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/lhn-nhs/on/trentsevern/info/infonet.

This Watershed Condition Statement – Water Safety will be in effect through Friday, May 3rd, 2019.  

Kawartha Conservation will continue monitoring local watercourses and notify the public and municipalities within its watershed jurisdiction of any changes. We are in close communication with partner agencies such as the Trent Severn Waterway, Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, and neighbouring Conservation Authorities as to the current situation.

If you are aware of or have concerns about flooding, please contact Kawartha Conservation at 705.328.2271 or 705.344.0155 after hours.

Iryna Shulyarenko                                                                         Emma Collyer                                                                 
Hydrologist                                                                                    Director, Integrated Watershed Management         

Watershed Conditions Statement – Water Safety is a general notice that existing or potential conditions pose a risk to personal safety.  Watershed Conditions Statements - Water Safety may be issued when streams are flowing at or near bankfull levels, when ice conditions are unsafe, or when stream banks are icy, soft and/or slippery.

 

A strong low pressure system is predicted to pass through southern Ontario, including the Kawartha Conservation watershed, in the next three days, bringing significant amounts of precipitation. Rain is expected to start tonight persisting into Saturday. As forecast by the Ministry of Natural Resources, total precipitation of up to 50 mm can be expected over the next three days with locally higher amounts possible due to thunderstorms.

Flood OutlookWATERSHED CONDITIONS STATEMENT – FLOOD OUTLOOK

DATE:                   April 17, 2019
TIME:                   2:00 p.m.

Message sent on the basis of information received from:

  • Kawartha Conservation Flood Forecasting Network
  • Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry – Surface Water Monitoring Center
  • Environment Canada
  • Trent-Severn Waterway

A WATERSHED CONDITIONS STATEMENT - FLOOD OUTLOOK is now in effect for the entire jurisdiction of the Kawartha Conservation watershed. This message replaces Watershed Conditions Statement - Water Safety -Kawartha Lakes that was issued Tuesday, April 16th 2019.

A strong low pressure system is predicted to pass through southern Ontario, including the Kawartha Conservation watershed, in the next three days, bringing significant amounts of precipitation. Rain is expected to start tonight persisting into Saturday. As forecast by the Ministry of Natural Resources, total precipitation of up to 50 mm can be expected over the next three days with locally higher amounts possible due to thunderstorms.

Water levels in local rivers and streams within the watershed are still slightly elevated from the past precipitation events. The ground is saturated and does not have much capacity to absorb additional precipitation. Therefore, the forecast precipitation is expected to produce significant runoff.  

As a result, water levels and velocities in local watercourses will increase. Water accumulation may occur in low-lying areas, road ditches, and areas with poor drainage. Rivers and streams may reach or overflow in some locations, their banks. Smaller steams will react quickly, but larger watercourses will take longer to respond.

The water levels in the large Kawartha Lakes will continue to increase as a large amount of water is passing through the system toward Lake Ontario. As reported by Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry and Trent-Severn Waterway, flow in the northern tributaries will keep increasing as a result of intensified runoff from the snowmelt and precipitation. As those rivers flow into the Kawartha Lakes, water levels of Balsam, Cameron, Sturgeon and Pigeon Lakes will continue to rise.

Under current watershed conditions and expected precipitation, all local rivers, streams, and lakes should be considered extremely dangerous. Riverbanks will be slippery and unsafe, and may be undercut. Kawartha Conservation is warning all residents to stay away from water bodies, as well as water structures such as bridges, culverts, and dams.

Children should be warned of dangerous conditions and caregivers should maintain a close watch on children who are outside.
Municipalities are advised to monitor areas known for minor flooding and be prepared to respond to high water situations as they occur. Residents are advised to contact their municipalities should a flood threat develop. Local municipalities are first to respond to and assist with flood emergencies.

Trent-Severn Waterway officials are monitoring water levels and flows throughout the system very closely and make adjustments to the water control structures as required. Additional information from the TSW is available at the Water Management InfoNet web page https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/lhn-nhs/on/trentsevern/info/infonet .

Water levels of northern tributaries such as the Gull and Burnt rivers continue increasing. For additional information on Gull and Burnt River conditions please refer to the messages issued by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) at https://www.ontario.ca/law-and-safety/flood-forecasting-and-warning-program  or contact the Minden Area office at 705-286-5207.

Kawartha Conservation will continue monitoring local watercourses and notify the public and municipalities within its watershed jurisdiction of any changes. We are in close communication with partner agencies such as the Trent Severn Waterway, Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, and neighbouring Conservation Authorities on this situation.

If you are aware of or have concerns about flooding, please contact Kawartha Conservation at 705.328.2271 or 705.344.0155 after hours.
This Watershed Conditions Statement-Flood Outlook will be in effect through Tuesday, April 23rd, 2018.

Iryna Shulyarenko                                                                         Emma Collyer
Hydrologist                                                                                    Director, Integrated Watershed Management

Watershed Conditions Statement – Flood Outlook is an early notice of the potential for flooding based on weather forecasts calling for heavy rain, snow melt, high wind or conditions that could lead to high runoff, cause ice jams, lakeshore flooding or erosion.

A WATERSHED CONDITIONS STATEMENT - FLOOD OUTLOOK is now in effect for the entire jurisdiction of the Kawartha Conservation watershed. This message replaces Watershed Conditions Statement - Water Safety that was issued Thursday, April 11th 2019.

Flood OutlookDATE:                   April 12, 2019
TIME:                   3:00 p.m.

Message sent on the basis of information received from:
•    Kawartha Conservation Flood Forecasting Network
•    Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry
•    Environment Canada
•    Trent-Severn Waterway

A WATERSHED CONDITIONS STATEMENT - FLOOD OUTLOOK is now in effect for the entire jurisdiction of the Kawartha Conservation watershed. This message replaces Watershed Conditions Statement - Water Safety that was issued Thursday, April 11th 2019.

A low pressure system is currently passing through southern Ontario, including Kawartha Conservation Watershed, bringing about 5 mm of rain. Another strong low pressure system is expected to move quickly through the region on Sunday and overnight into Monday, bringing additional 35 – 40 mm of rain.

Water levels in local rivers and streams within the watershed are slightly elevated from ongoing spring snow melt and past precipitation events. The ground is saturated or still partly frozen and does not have much capacity to adsorb additional precipitation. Therefore, the forecast precipitation is expected to produce significant runoff.  

As a result, water levels and velocities in local watercourses will increase. Water accumulation may occur in low-lying areas, road ditches, and areas with poor drainage. Rivers and streams may reach or overflow in some locations, their banks. Smaller steams will react fast, but larger watercourses will take longer to respond.

The water levels in the large Kawartha Lakes will continue rising due to higher inflows from northern tributaries such as the Burnt and Gull rivers. As reported by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry and Trent-Severn Waterway, flow in the northern tributaries will keep increasing as a result of intensified runoff from the snowmelt and upcoming precipitation. As those rivers flow into the Kawartha Lakes, water levels of Balsam, Cameron, Sturgeon and Pigeon Lakes will continue rising. The daily rate of water level rise is expected to increase, compared to recent conditions.  

Under expected watershed conditions, all local rivers, streams, and lakes should be considered extremely dangerous. Riverbanks will be slippery and unsafe; any remaining ice cover is unstable and hazardous. Kawartha Conservation is warning all residents to stay away from water bodies, as well as water structures such as bridges, culverts, and dams. Children should be warned of dangerous conditions and caregivers should maintain a close watch on children who are outside.

Municipalities are advised to monitor areas known for minor flooding and be prepared to respond to high water situations as they occur. Residents are advised to contact their municipalities should a flood threat develop. Local municipalities are first to respond to and assist with flood emergencies.

Trent-Severn Waterway officials are monitoring water levels and flows throughout the system very closely and make adjustments to the water control structures as required. Additional information from the TSW is available at the Water Management InfoNet web page https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/lhn-nhs/on/trentsevern/info/infonet .

Water levels of northern tributaries such as the Gull and Burnt rivers continuing increasing. For additional information on Gull and Burnt River conditions please refer to the messages issued by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) at https://www.ontario.ca/law-and-safety/flood-forecasting-and-warning-program  or contact the Minden Area office at 705-286-5207.

Kawartha Conservation will continue monitoring local watercourses and notify the public and municipalities within its watershed jurisdiction of any changes. We are in close communication with partner agencies such as the Trent Severn Waterway, Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, and neighbouring Conservation Authorities on this upcoming situation.

If you are aware of or have concerns about flooding, please contact Kawartha Conservation at 705.328.2271 or 705.344.0155 after hours.

This Watershed Conditions Statement-Flood Outlook will be in effect through Tuesday, April 16th, 2018.

Iryna Shulyarenko                                                                         Emma Collyer
Hydrologist                                                                                   Director, Integrated Watershed Management

Watershed Conditions Statement – Flood Outlook is an early notice of the potential for flooding based on weather forecasts calling for heavy rain, snow melt, high wind or conditions that could lead to high runoff, cause ice jams, lakeshore flooding or erosion.

Friday, 15 March 2019 09:48

FLOOD WATCH

A FLOOD WATCH is now in effect for the Kawartha Conservation watershed jurisdiction.

A series of rain showers and thunderstorms have passed through southern Ontario, including the Kawartha Conservation watershed, over the last 24 hours. Rain gauges across the watershed have recorded 5 to 15 mm of precipitation. Air temperature has reached as high 10°C, creating favourable conditions for snowmelt. 

FLOOD WATCHFlood Watch

DATE:    March 15, 2019
TIME:    9:00 am 

              
Message sent on the basis of information received from:
•    Kawartha Conservation Flood Forecasting Network
•    Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry - Surface Water Monitoring Centre
•    Environment Canada
•    Trent-Severn Waterway

A FLOOD WATCH is now in effect for the Kawartha Conservation watershed jurisdiction.

A series of rain showers and thunderstorms have passed through southern Ontario, including the Kawartha Conservation watershed, over the last 24 hours. Rain gauges across the watershed have recorded 5 to 15 mm of precipitation. Air temperature has reached as high 10°C, creating favourable conditions for snowmelt.    
Precipitation, combined with snowmelt and frozen ground conditions are resulting in significant runoff. Water levels in local rivers and streams are currently rapidly increasing or peaking and exceeding their bankfull conditions in multiple locations. Smaller steams are responding faster, while it takes longer for larger watercourses to react.

In these watershed conditions all local watercourses run very high and fast. Flooding in low lying areas, areas adjacent to streams and road ditches has been observed. Surface water roads flooding may occur. Ponding of water on urban surfaces may occur as storm sewer systems can become overwhelmed by high runoff or clogged with snow, ice and debris. Rapid deterioration of the ice cover on local rivers and streams has been observed.

As precipitation moves out of the region later today and air temperature returning back to below freezing mark, it is expected that water levels will stabilize and start declining.

Under these watershed conditions all local watercourses should be considered extremely dangerous. Kawartha Conservation is warning all residents to stay away from all water bodies, as well as water structures such as bridges, culverts, and dams. Riverbanks are slippery and unsafe; ice cover where it exists is unstable and hazardous.  Children should be warned of dangerous conditions and caregivers should maintain a close watch on children who are outside.

Municipalities are advised to monitor areas known for flooding and be prepared to respond to high water situations as they occur. As local municipalities are first to respond to and assist with flood emergencies, residents are advised to contact their municipalities should a flood threat develop.

Trent-Severn Waterway officials are closely watching this current situation and will be adjusting dam settings throughout the system when the situation warrants. Staff from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry are monitoring water levels of the Burnt and Gull rivers.

Burnt and Gull River levels are monitored by staff from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF). Residents along these two rivers are requested to direct any questions concerning water levels to the MNRF Minden office at 705-286-5207, or refer to the City of Kawartha Lakes website below for additional information:   www.kawarthalakes.ca/flood.

For assistance in the event of a flood, and sandbag requests, please call your municipality

This Flood Watch will be in effect until Monday, March 19th, 2019.  Kawartha Conservation will continue monitoring water levels and watershed conditions and notify the public and municipalities within its watershed jurisdiction of any changes. If you are aware of or have concerns about flooding, please contact Kawartha Conservation at 705.328.2271 or 705.344.0155 after hours.

Iryna Shulyarenko                                                                         Emma Collyer     
Hydrologist                                                                                    Director, Integrated Watershed Management                                                   

A Flood Watch is a notice that flooding is possible in specific watercourses or municipalities.

Municipalities, emergency services, and individual landowners in flood-prone areas should prepare. Responses to flood events are handled by Municipal emergency services.  

Flood Forecasting services for the Burnt and Gull Rivers watersheds is provided by Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, Minden Office (tel. 705-286-5207)

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