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Source protection plans were created to ensure the long-term viability of municipal residential water supplies and to ensure another Walkerton incident does not occur. These plans identify activities and proposed policies to protect these local water supplies. A group of these policies implement planning powers identified in the Clean Water Act , which focus on early planning measures and preventative action through the development of Risk Management Plans.

Risk Management Plans are developed where activities that are a risk to water supply can be managed through a series of best management measures. The Risk Management Official will contact you if you require a risk management plan, which needs to be developed in response to implementation of the Source Protection Plan, or you may be referred to them by the planning and/or building department if you are planning a future activity that may require a risk management plan. The risk management plan is negotiated between the Risk Management Official and the person engaged in the activity,

Any development application submitted in an area that is identified as being near a municipal water supply will require a notice from the Risk Management Official to move forward. This ensures that any activities or development proposed, will not be a risk to the water supply, or can be managed. In some cases, a serious threat to drinking water will not be allowed and a notice cannot be issued. Please see below for a chart outlining the process to follow for building applications and planning applications. An application for a notice will need to be submitted to the Risk Management Official if you are in a protected area.

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Frequently asked Questions:

  • How do I know if I am in a protected area?

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    There are two types of protected areas where source protection policies apply: Intake Protection Zones (IPZs) and Wellhead Protection Areas (WHPAs) . These are areas that are located nearby a municipal residential water supply system. Intake Protection Zones are the areas surrounding surface water intakes and Wellhead Protection Areas are the areas surrounding ground water wells. There are two plans that are active in the City of Kawartha Lakes – the Trent Source Protection Plan, which covers the Trent River Watershed and the South Georgian Bay-Lake Simcoe Source Protection Plan, which covers the Lake Simcoe watershed. Find your property using the interactive map sites below. If your property is within one of the areas outlined on the map, you are in a protected area.

    Provincial Source Protection Maps
    CA Maps

    For additional information or to see the reports for your system, please visit the sites below:

    Trent Source Protection 
    South Georgian Bay- Lake Simcoe 

    If you find yourself in one of these areas, the source water protection regulations apply to you. This means that activities that you do on your property could have an impact on the local residential water supply. You may have to submit an application to the RMO related to a building or planning application to ensure that activities you do will not have an impact. An analysis will occur to ensure the drinking water quality at these systems will not be affected.

    For more information or to confirm whether or not your property is in a protected area, please contact your local Risk Management Official.

  • Which water supply systems are included?

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    Drinking water systems covered by the source protection planning process include only municipal residential systems which supply drinking water to more than 5 residences.  Other systems not on municipal water supply, such as municipal non-residential (e.g. arenas), non-municipal systems (e.g. camps, trailer parks, rural facilities, etc.) or private systems are not included. 

    To learn more about your municipal drinking water system please click here if you are within the Kawartha watershed and here if you are within the Lake Simcoe watershed.

  • I’ve been contacted by a Risk Management Official to develop a Risk Management Plan with them. What does this mean?

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    Your property is in an area that is close to a residential drinking water supply that the municipality owns/operates. It is important to ensure that activities in this area will not have an impact on the future viability of the drinking water. During work leading up to the source protection plan, a number of activities were identified as significant risks to the water supply. These risks are identified in the plan and needing to be managed to ensure they won’t become a realized threat to your community’s drinking water supply. The Risk Management Plan is a plan developed between the landowner and the Risk Management Official to ensure this objective is met. See “What is a Risk Management Plan” for more information.

  • I’ve been asked by the municipal building department or planning department to contact the Risk Management Official. What does this mean?

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    Your property is in an area that is close to a residential drinking water supply that the municipality owns/operates. It is important to ensure that activities in this area will not have an impact on the future viability of the drinking water. The evaluation of these activities is performed by the Risk Management Official, who evaluates the activity against reference conditions and policies in the applicable source protection plan. A notice will be required from the Risk Management Official before the municipality will move forward with an approval (Building Department) or receipt of a development application (Planning Department).

    Depending on the type of activity, a Risk Management Plan may need to be developed, which seeks to manage an activity to ensure that it will not cause harm to the drinking water supply. Other activities may be prohibited as identified in the Source Protection Plan.

  • Who are the Risk Management Officials/Risk Management Inspectors?

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    RMOs and RMIs are appointed by a municipality that is responsible for implementing local Source Protection Plan policies and trained to standards set by provincial regulation. Kawartha Conservation provides the risk management services for the City of Kawartha Lakes.

    A Risk Management Official is responsible for protecting municipal residential water supply systems by implementing policies identified in locally formed source protection plans. They do this in concert with the duties identified in the Clean Water Act, 2006 and specifically Part IV of the Act. Negotiation of Risk Management Plans, issuing notices for planning and building development applications (restricted land use notices) are key duties.

    A Risk Management Inspector is responsible for ensuring that Risk Management Plans are carried out and that activities are not introduced in protected areas that would pose a risk to the water supply system.

    For more information, contact the City of Kawartha Lakes Risk Management Official/Inspector:

    277 Kenrei Rd
    Lindsay, ON
    K9V 4R1
    705-328-2271 ext. 245 or 215

    If you are looking for a Risk Management Official for surrounding municipalities, please click here.

  • How long will it take for the Risk Management Official to issue a Notice?

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    There are two types of notices - a notice that requires a Risk Management Plan to be developed prior to the issuance of a notice, and one that does not.  When a Risk Management Plan is required the types of activities proposed have a likelihood of impacting the drinking water supply if not managed well.  Please see “How long it will take to develop a Risk Management Plan”.

    If a Risk Management Plan is not required, then we will strive to issue the notice within 10 days of receiving a completed application form.  It is important to fill out the form completely so we are able to evaluate the activity, and there may be some follow-up from the Risk Management Official to ensure they understand the type of activity that is proposed.  If an application form is filled out partially, it may increase the time to issue a notice.

  • How long will it take to develop a Risk Management Plan?

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    A Risk Management Plan can vary from a simple plan, which may only take a few weeks to create (e.g. fuel oil), to more complex plans, which may take several months (e.g. agricultural, business, industrial). When an application is received, the Risk Management Official will be in contact with you to identify if a Risk Management Plan is required for your proposed activity or development.

  • What is a Risk Management Plan (RMP)?

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    In protected areas, certain activities or land uses are only permitted if a Risk Management Plan is created.  A Risk Management Plan is a document that is negotiated between the landowner (or someone conducting an activity) and the Risk Management Official to ensure that the activity will not cause harm (be a threat) to drinking water.  There are several instances where the RMP can be initiated, such as through filing a building or planning application with the municipality, or by the Risk Management Official, who is following up on information contained in the Source Protection Assessment Report.

    The Risk Management Plan identifies activities that are threats to the municipal water supply and will recognize risk management measures that already exist and, if necessary, includes other measures to fill gaps in management and minimize the risks posed to the drinking water supply

    A risk management plan is typically developed by the person engaged in the activity or by a third party consultant, with guidance from the Risk Management Official.  In some cases, the Risk Management Official may prepare the Risk Management Plan completely, at the request of the person engaged in the activity.  It is not possible to transfer a RMP to another person, unless there is written approval from the RMO.  If a new threat action is undertaken on the property, a new RMP will be required, even if the owner or tenant stays the same. 

  • Do I still need a Risk Management Plan if I lease my land out?

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    If you are not the person engaging in the threat activity, you do not need a Risk Management Plan. Only the person engaged in the activity needs an Risk Management Plan. If you are a tenant, your landowner should be aware of the Risk Management Plan and have a copy.

  • Can I install a new septic system in a protected area?

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    Yes, you can install a new septic system in a protected area. This new system will be inspected upon installation, and it will have to be inspected every 5 years once the installation is completed. You will also require a permit for the system installation from the local Health Unit or municipality.

  • I have an older septic system in a protected area. Will I have to replace it?

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    If you have a septic system which was installed on or before January 1, 2011 it is required that this system is inspected by October 23, 2019 for the Kawartha watershed.  Once the inspection has taken place, the inspector will be able to instruct you on whether or not your system needs replacement.  Your system will have to be inspected every 5 years once this initial inspection is completed.  For more information, please click here.

  • I have a residential fuel tank in a protected area. What will I have to do?

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    A Risk Management Official will contact you if you have a residential fuel tank and you live in a protected area. You and the Risk Management Official will then negotiate a Risk Management Plan to ensure that your tank does not pose a drinking water threat.

  • How much fuel can I store at my residence before I require a Risk Management Plan?

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    Risk Management Plans are only required for the storage of large volumes of fuel.  In order to be considered a threat, the volume of fuel being stored must be more than 250 L (66 gallons).  You will require a Risk Management Plan if you heat your home using heating oil as those fuel tanks are normally around 900 L (238 gallons), and if the tank is located in your basement. 

    If your tank is not in your basement or you have a commercial/industrial or institutional tank, please contact the Risk Management Official as these situations are more complex.

    A couple of 20 L (5 gallon) Jerry cans of gas in your garage are not considered a significant threat.

  • If I put road salt on my driveway and walkway do I require a Risk Management Plan?

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    No, the application of road salt to your driveway or walkway does not require a Risk Management Plan because the volume of salt being applied is not high enough to have a significant impact on the drinking water of your system.

  • What activities are prohibited?

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    Prohibition policies have been identified in source protection plans to ensure that certain activities never become established in areas where the activities could cause serious harm to the drinking water system.  An example is if specific chemicals or bacteria under certain conditions got into the drinking water source, such as fuel oil for a groundwater system.  These activities are called significant drinking water threats.  A number of these activities are related to farming practices.

    The following are examples of future acts which may be prohibited:

    • the application of agricultural source material, commercial fertilizer, pesticides, or non-agricultural source material to land
    • the storage of agricultural source material, commercial fertilizer, pesticides, or non-agricultural source material to land
    • the handling of commercial fertilizer, pesticides, or non-agricultual source material
    • the use of land as livestock grazing or pasturing land, an outdoor confinement area or a farm animal yard
    • the storage of fuel

    If you are considering expanding your existing farming operation or farming in new areas, please contact the Risk Management Official for these cases.

  • If I know I am in a protected area but I am unsure if I am engaging in a threat how can I find out?

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    If you know that you are in a protected area but are unsure whether or not the activity you are engaging in would be considered a threat to drinking water, you can contact the Risk Management Official at Kawartha Conservation.  If you require a Risk Management Plan, we will work with you to develop one.

    Risk Management Official/Risk Management Inspector
    705-328-2271 ext. 245 or 215

  • Is there any funding available to help me out?

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    At this time there is no funding available for implementation activities related to out protection plan policies.  There is, however, no fee to submit an application for a notice, or to develop a Risk Management Plan at this time.

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KAWARTHA-HALIBURTON SOURCE PROTECTION AUTHORITY

Meeting Minutes
May 26, 2016 Minutes
January 27, 2016 Minutes
March 26, 2014 Minutes
February 19, 2014 Minutes